Amazon Ads – Nothing Yet

When last we met, I had thrown in the towel on Kindle lockscreen ads ($20 in ads led to zero sales). I set up a couple regular Amazon ads to see what would happen. Here’s what I’ve learned so far:

  • “Automatic Targeting” doesn’t work. I have a 50¢ PPC bid, which is more than Amazon recommended, and no impressions at all on that campaign.
  • Book targeting doesn’t work. I’m getting a few impressions, but it’s negligible. It seems that you would have to manually adjust the bid for every book, because the recommended bid levels have a huge range. So at a fixed 50¢ bid, I would win on books nobody looks at, and I lose on books that people actually visit. The bid required for bestsellers is bonkers ($3.67, for example).
  • Category targeting does get impressions, so that’s something.
  • So far I have 1,665 impressions, and have spent 89¢. That’s 3 clicks, or a CTR of 0.18%. So basically, no clicks and no sales.

I’m going to suspend those two campaigns and set up two new ones based on this information: manual category targeting only. Stay tuned!

Amazon Lockscreen Ad Verdict

Singularity

My new novel!

Last time we talked, I had launched some Amazon “Lockscreen Ads” to see if they might be an effective strategy for my latest novel. This one just happens to be a trendy topic with broad appeal, so I figured it’s a good candidate for the Amazon advertising machine. Alas, these ads were a complete failure.

Over the course of a month, the three ads (you can see them in this post) generated 44 clicks at 50¢ apiece, resulting in zero sales. Those 44 clicks were tied to about 16,000 impressions, which means 0.27% click-through-rate (about a quarter of the 1% CTR I’ve experienced with Twitter ads). From this we can theorize:

  • Very few people click on Kindle Lockscreen Ads
  • A lot of those clicks are probably accidental

A conversion rate of zero books from 44 clicks just doesn’t makes sense if these were intentional clicks. Other bloggers have theorized that a lot of the clicks on lockscreen ads don’t even lead to a product page because the device is offline. I don’t know if that’s true, or if those clicks get charged, but it would be consistent with my results.

So what’s next? Straight-up Amazon Ads. The creative for Amazon Ads is the same as for lockscreen ads: just a tweet’s worth of words. I’m going to use the same words I used in lockscreen ads #2 & #3 (those got more clicks than #1, but I suspect that has more to do with targeting than the words in the ad).

For one of them, I’m letting Amazon target automatically. For the other, I am targeting a couple relevant book genres and a whole bunch of individual books that talk about cryptocurrency. I’m bidding 50¢ and letting Amazon lower that bid if it wants (but I’m not letting them raise it). I’ll report back when I get some news.